“One is never cured of a yearning for freedom.” ~Édouard René Lefèbvre de Laboulaye.

Statue-Liberty-Wall-Sculpture

Laboulaye can be thanked for the conceptualizing the Statue of Liberty. He was a Frenchman who strongly stood for freedom and admired the United States constitution. In 1865 he proposed that the monument be erected in New York Harbor, a gift from the French citizens to the United States people. A sister Lady Liberty statue would find a home in Luxemoburg Gardens, Paris, France. Though many miles apart the sister statues were constructed to face each other.

Statue Of Liberty 21

Statue Of Liberty 21″ High

Although, Laboulaye devised the concept it was Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi who ultimately designed the Statue of Liberty as we know it. Lady Liberty is a portrayal of Libertas, the Roman goddess of liberty. Her hands strongly clutch a torch and a tablet evoking the law. At her feet you will notice broken chains. All of these aspects are symbolic of freedom and justice.

Like Aboulaye so eloquently put, freedom is never yearned for less. There is no other statue as symbolic for liberty and justice for all than that of the statue of liberty. The fact that the Statue of Liberty was a gift from the French to the United States shows brotherhood between nations and illustrates the human need for freedom.

We are so proud to include these sculptures within our galleries because we so strongly believe in the message and symbolism behind the Statue of Liberty. We are also proud of our other patriotic statues and sculptures such as Armed Forces Military Branches Sculptures Set of FiveWar Memorial Battle Cross Boots Gun Helmet Statue and Nurse and Sailor Inspired by Wold War II Sculpture.

Please visit our website to view our entire gallery of fountains, sculptures,  and fine decor . If you have something in mind but cannot find it on the website, feel free to contact us. Our excellent products coupled with our outstanding customer service ensures Statue.com is the best business for statuary and other fine goods.

Reach us by phone Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (CT) 618-692-1121 or Toll-Free at 877-675-2634.

Email me at kristen@statue.com

Our fax number is 618-692-6775.

Send mail to us at: Statue.com, Inc., 100 N. Main St. Edwardsville, IL 62025.

We’d love to hear from you!

~Kristen

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Saint Patrick

Saint Patrick

I am imperfect in many things, nevertheless I want my brethren and kinsfolk to know my nature so that they may be able to perceive my soul’s desire.” ~Saint Patrick 

Saint Patrick Faux Granite Statue 24

Saint Patrick Faux Granite Statue 24″ inches high

Saint Patrick was born in Scotland around year 387. The area for which Saint Patrick grew up in was ruled by the Roman military. As a teenager he was captured by a raiding party and forced into slavery. He was taken to Ireland to tend to sheep as a Shepard. He learned the language and traditions of his captors. Ireland at this time was comprised of Druids and Pagans.

It is also during this time Saint Patrick turned to God and prayer. His captivity lasted until his early twenties, where he had a dream about escaping and returning to his family. He acted out on this dream and eventually reunited with his family.

Back in Scotland, Saint Patrick studied to become a priest. He would later return to Ireland to build churches and reform the people of Ireland. He used the famous shamrock to explain the Holy Trinity. The shamrock has been associated with him and Ireland since this time.

We hope you enjoyed  this tidbit of Saint Patrick. Stay tuned for next week’s Saint installment of the blog. In the meantime, head on over to our website to view our fine gallery of sculptures, fountains and garden accessories.

If you have something in mind but cannot find it on the website, feel free to contact us. Our excellent products coupled with our outstanding customer service ensures Statue.com is the best business for statuary and other fine goods.

Reach us by phone Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (CT) 618-692-1121 or Toll-Free at 877-675-2634.

Email us at sales@statue.com

Our fax number is 618-692-6775.

Send mail to us at: Statue.com, Inc., 100 N. Main St. Edwardsville, IL 62025.

We’d love to hear from you!

~Kristen

Cathedral Hands By Auguste Rodin Statue

Statue.com proudly features the work of The Egregia Italian Collection. This line represents one of the most prestigious museum-quality sculptures in the world. If traveling aboard you will find many reproduction of statuary from this gallery. In fact, nothing comes closer to an original hand carved marble sculpture than the Egregia replicas. When you purchase an Egregia, you can count on receiving nothing but the best, closest to the original piece of art.

The original models of the sculptures were created by A. Giannelli, founder of Egregia. The firm is located in Volterra the heart of Italy’s alabaster district. Giannelli devoted much of his life to sculpture and eventually opened his own studio in 1944, supplying pieces to the Allied Forces.  Giannelli has been commissioned to create busts by the United States, Kenya and Boston University.

The Egregia pieces Statue.com carries have been crafted out of the models Giannelli sculpted. The Egregia factory produces sculptures of  recomposed stone, consisting of alabaster and marble powder and resin. Each sculpture is then finished with care by the artisans of Italy’s Egregia Workshop, providing excellent durability, quality and detail.

African Princess Bust

An Egregia sculpture from Statue.com will be a beautiful addition to any collection.  Furthermore, these beautiful sculpted figurines of historical and classic statues from artist and sculptor A. Giannelli will bring much pleasure to any history buff or anyone with an affinity for art.

To view our fine Egregia gallery, head on over to our website www.statue.com. If you have something in mind but cannot find it on the website feel free to contact us. Our excellent products coupled with our outstanding customer service ensures Statue.com is the best business for statuary and other fine goods.

Reach us by phone Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (CT) 618-692-1121 or Toll-Free at 877-675-2634

Our fax number is 618-692-6775.

Send mail to us at: Statue.com, Inc., 100 N. Main St. Edwardsville, IL 62025.

We’d love to hear from you!

~Kristen

Egyptian Queen Nefertiti

Statue.com’s co-founder Gloria has been around statuary a long, long time. Me? I confess, I am sort of a newbie. The more I research and read about the history of statuary for blogs, the more I learn just how integral statuary is to history.

Take for example the Egyptian Queen Nefertiti’s Bust, without this sculpture we would not have a three-dimensional idea of her appearance. Sure, there are hieroglyphics and other carvings giving a brief glimpse of her existence but it is this bust that gives us a remarkable look at this historical woman. A strong neckline and pointed features are caught in the sculpture as a moment in time; making her personable but also regal. Little is known about the Egyptian Queen, however her bust has been one of the most recreated pieces of Egyptian art. This is a testament of the importance and beauty of this piece. How cool that you can bring a replica of a work-of-art that existed over three-thousand years ago into your home for every day appreciation?

Beethoven Bust Prometheus Portrait

The busts of great music composers are another example of capturing a face in time. I found it interesting the use of a ‘life mask’ was used in creating one of the most famous Beethoven’s bust. This method captures the intensity of the famous musician. From the bust you can see his wild hair, furrowed eyebrows and stern expression. It appears as though Beethoven is contemplating his next masterpiece nearly two-hundred years after his existence.  Of course Beethoven’s music lives on but so does his presence thanks in part to this sculpture.

Lincoln Sculptural Bust

Presidential Busts are another example of using sculpture to capture time. The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum in Springfield, Illinois has a series of busts through his tenure as president. It is particularly interesting and apparent the stress that weighed on President Lincoln through the course of his term. Bags under his eyes, increasing wrinkles, the weight of the world was on his shoulders, all captured through sculpture. The change in appearance is true for all presidents but Lincoln’s example is exceptional.  These busts are not exclusive to museums, Statue.com offers a fine gallery of presidential busts.

To view our gallery of fine statuary, head on over to our website http://www.statue.com. If you have something in mind but cannot find it on the website feel free to contact us.

Reach us by phone Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (CT) 618-692-1121 or Toll-Free at 877-675-2634

Our fax number is 618-692-6775.

Send mail to us at: Statue.com, Inc., 100 N. Main St. Edwardsville, IL 62025.

We’d love to hear from you!

~Kristen

Eagle Sculpture of Freedom

One of my favorite things to do in the early spring is to travel up the river road and watch the bald eagles nest, just North of Grafton, Illinois. For those of you not familiar with the area, Grafton is located about 40 miles north of St. Louis on the Illinois side of the river.

The eagles have such a majestic, regal presence as the soar effortlessly through the air. It is no surprise this animal embodies the symbolism of pride, strength, freedom, unity and longevity. This symbolism is precisely why the Founding Fathers choose the Bald Eagle to represent the United States.

On June 20, 1782, the Second Continental Congress adopted the Great Seal of the United States depicting a bald eagle clutching 13 arrows and a 13 leaf olive branch. From there Bald Eagles would also appear on United States’ coins, bills, the presidential flag and many federal agency logos.

Bald Eagle with American Flag

By adding our Eagle Sculptures to your collection you will also be adding beautiful symbolism and a piece of history too. To view our gallery of fine statuary and sculptures, head on over to our website http://www.statue.com. If you have something in mind but cannot find it on the website feel free to contact us.

Reach us by phone Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (CT) 618-692-1121 or Toll-Free at 877-675-2634

Our fax number is 618-692-6775.

Send mail to us at: Statue.com, Inc., 100 N. Main St. Edwardsville, IL 62025.

We’d love to hear from you!

~Kristen

Edgar Degas has always been one of my favorite painters. His ability to capture movement of his favorite subjects, ballet dancers, is parallel to no other artist. Even when not performing his delicate dancers appeared in fluid motion, blending the fierce pride of a ballerina with sharply defined muscles and graceful control.

I did not realize Degas was also a prolific sculptor until I was doing research for different piece for Statue.com. Apparently, his sculpting capabilities were not known to the world until after his death. The only sculpture he publicly unveiled was titled “Fourteen Year Old Little Dancer.” Critics at the time were not-so-nice to Degas’ step away his usual form of Impressionism. After that negative experience he kept his sculptures private. Degas gravitated towards sculpture largely due to his failing eyesight. It is hard to fathom losing the ability to partake in a talent that was once critically acclaimed. To channel those talents in a different way but not receive the same acclaim would be even more heartbreaking.

Dancer Looking at the Sole of Her Right Foot

One hundred and fifty sculptures were found in Degas’ studio upon his death. Nearly all had reached some form of deterioration, made of wax, clay and plastiline. There was much debate as to what to do with the sculptures. Luckily for us, Degas’s heirs granted casts to be made from seventy-two of the figures. Including the sculptures, Little Dancer of Fourteen Years, Dancer Looking at the Sole of Her Right Foot and Grande Arabesque. The sculptures were to be cast in bronze, as we know them today. Their rough from is attributed to the deterioration of his medium but no less beautiful.  It is a shame to think these sculptures could have been lost in time.

By now most of the original works have deteriorated even more. Majority of these sculptures were not completed due to Degas’ indecisiveness. This is a common theme through artists. Michelangelo left a vast amount of work uncompleted. I guess you could say great minds operate alike.

It is hard to deny the beauty of Degas’ sculptures even in their rough unfinished form.  We are very proud to include them in our Statue.com gallery.

Grande Arabesque

To view our gallery of fine statuary, head on over to our website http://www.statue.com. If you have something in mind but cannot find it on the website feel free to contact us.

Reach us by phone Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (CT) 618-692-1121 or Toll-Free at 877-675-2634

Our fax number is 618-692-6775.

Send mail to us at: Statue.com, Inc., 100 N. Main St. Edwardsville, IL 62025.

We’d love to hear from you!

~Kristen

 

 

A Modern Discus Thrower – The Olympic Games were first held in the year 776 B.C. In July of every fourth year men came together from all over the Greek world to participate in the athletic contests. Although there was great rivalry and intense competition among the athletes and their sponsoring city-states, the sacred games established a spirit of friendship and unity. Before the opening of each festival a sacred truce was called; throughout the land al fighting ceased. The games continued at Olympia until their abolishment by the Emperor Theodosius in 394 A.D., more than one thousand years after they had been established.

 

In 1896 the tradition was resumed. The participating nations felt that it was appropriate that the revival should take place in Greece where the games first took place. The great stadium in Athens was modernized for the event and a contemporary statue of a discus thrower by Dimitriades was placed directly facing the stadium. Throwing of the discus had been, as it is today, one of the five events of the original pentathlon. The Modern Discobulus above, was inspired by that of the Dimitriades to reaffirm the ancient Greek belief that the body of man is glorious, as is his spirit.

 

Although the classic Discobulus by Myron was cast in bronze, Statue.com offers this  lovely  version in a beautiful white,  bonded stone.

 

The Discus Thrower by Santini

The Discus Thrower by Santini