Statue.com's Gloria next to Perseus with the Head of Medusa Sculpture

Perseus with the Head of Medusa Sculpture

As myth has it, Medusa was a hideous, terrifying woman with poisonous snakes for hair. One glance her direction would turn result in being turned to stone. Perseus, the hero, was responsible for her demise. He was gifted  a mirrored shield from Athena, gold, winged sandals from Hermes, a sword from Hephaestus and Hades’ helm of invisibility to battle the cruel Medusa. Perseus slayed Medusa by chopping off her head using Athena’s mirrored shied to avoid looking directly at her. Medusa was pregnant at the time of her slaying. When Perseus beheaded Medusa, she gave birth to Pegasus, a wing horse. In return for allowing Perseus to borrow Athena’s shield, he gave her Medusa’s head. Athena in return put Medusa’s head on the shield for further protection.

Perseus Wall Mask

The myth of Medusa and Perseus has remained popular through the centuries. It has been the subject of many artwork. When Gloria, Statue.com founder, visited Florence, Italy she visited the bronze sculpture of Perseus with the Head of Medusa. This statue was sculpted by the Italian, Benvenuto Cellini. Side note about, Cellini, he was a gifted sculptor but was also quite violent. He had shot and injured Philibert of Châlon, prince of Orange and killed Charles III, Duke of Bourbon. He also murdered his brother’s killer in what he called ‘blood revenge.’

Alright, back on topic, there are many other famous of pieces of Medusa and Perseus that do not require a flight to Florence, Italy. The Perseus Wall Mask is great for an artist cast or drawing study.

Pegasus With Open Wings

The Pegasus is central to the Medusa and Perseus myth and often represented in sculpture. The Pegasus with Open Wings is composed of designer resin with an antique bronze finish.

To view more mythological pieces within our gallery head on over to our website. If you have something in mind but cannot find it on the website, feel free to contact us. Our excellent products coupled with our outstanding customer service ensures Statue.com is the best business for statuary and other fine goods.

Reach us by phone Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (CT) 618-692-1121 or Toll-Free at 877-675-2634

Our fax number is 618-692-6775.

Send mail to us at: Statue.com, Inc., 100 N. Main St. Edwardsville, IL 62025.

We’d love to hear from you!

~Kristen

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Apollo Belvedere Lost Wax Bronze Statue

Have you heard the expression “imitation is the most sincere form of flattery?” Well, the Greeks must have been blushing by the Romans’ flattery in the late fourth century, B.C. The Romans, at the time, were going through a period of wealth and expansion. They were mesmerized by Greek high society and copied their art forms. Among those forms, was sculpture. Don’t get me wrong, Romans produced their own conception of statuary and the like. Often the Romans would take a Greek statue, alter the face or make a change to assimilate the piece of art into their own culture. Over time the sculptures were in such high demand they would be mass produced and lose the meaning the Greeks intended, other then the aesthetic value.

Today, we are grateful for the Roman’s fascination with Greek artwork. Since Greek statuary was mostly in bronze, a good portion of the sculpture was melted down for use of the precious metal. Without Roman reproductions in marble the Greek bronze sculptures would have been lost in time. It is pretty cool to think the Romans preserved sculpture that even predated them by 500 years.

An example of a statue sculpted by the Ancient Greeks and copied by the Romans would be the Apollo Belvedere Lost Wax Bronze Statue. This famous classic bronze statue, was discovered in ruins of Pompey’s theater near Rome in the late 1400’s, and believe to be a Roman copy of the Greek sculptor, Leochares original bronze statue. Once in the private collection of Pope Julius II, it was moved to the Vatican in 1509 and placed in the Cortile del Belvedere, from which it derives its name. Our bronze Apollo statue is rife with fine detail from the draped robe to the sandaled feet. This 19th century French Bronze fully restored rendition of Apollo, has just overtaken the serpent Python, and just released a arrow from his bow. The effort impressed on his musculature still lingers. Apollo represents harmony, order, and reason and was considered the greatest ancient sculpture and for centuries epitomized ideals of aesthetic perfection for Europeans and westernized parts of the world.

To view other Ancient Roman and Greek statues head on over to our website. If you have something in mind but cannot find it on the website, feel free to contact us. Our excellent products coupled with our outstanding customer service ensures Statue.com is the best business for statuary and other fine goods.

Reach us by phone Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (CT) 618-692-1121 or Toll-Free at 877-675-2634

Our fax number is 618-692-6775.

Send mail to us at: Statue.com, Inc., 100 N. Main St. Edwardsville, IL 62025.

We’d love to hear from you!

~Kristen

Did you know Gargoyles can be traced back much further then the popular medieval notion? Gargoyles were used in Ancient Egyptian, Etruscan, Roman and Grecian architecture, commonly adorning structures in the form of lion heads. Medieval, Gothic gargoyles were not seen until after the fall of the Western Roman Empire. These Gargoyles were usually creatures carved out of stone with distorted faces or a mixture of different animals know as Chimeras. Churches often used Gargoyles to convey a message of good and evil. They were also said to ward off evil spirits. The most well known example would be Notre Dame de Paris. Notre Dame’s Gargoyles are not only aesthetic but functional too.

Gargoyles also serve a greater purpose then just cool ornamental structures. Their main function is to divert water off of buildings, alleviating masonry from water damage. In fact, the Italian phrase for gargoyle “gronda sporgente” translates to “protruding gutter.” Grotesque is the term used to describe ornamental stone figures that do not convey water. The use of Gargoyles faded out during the early eighteenth century when downspouts became commonplace. The British Parliament even passed an act in 1724, requiring all new construction to use downspouts. The need for government intervention is attributed to Gargoyles falling from buildings and causing damage.

Gargoyles may not have a common place in modern architecture but we think they add character to any home or garden. After all this guy is pretty lovable… acnsndg13