Nudes


Let’s hear your thoughts! Who do you think would win an epic duel between Hercules vs. Achilles?

Farnese Hercules Large Statue

Farnese Hercules Large Statue

It’s no wonder Hercules is portrayed to the point of exhaustion in this sculpture, The Farnese Hercules Statue. Famously Hercules had a huge ‘to-do’ list, known as the “Twelve Labors.” Make no mistake Hercules was no hero to mess with. Among those “Twelve Labors” was slaying a ferocious tiger which makes him a tough contender in our Mythological Duel.  The Farnese Hercules Statue was sculpted circa 330 B.C. and is now located in Museo Nazionale, Naples. This replica is from the Curators Collection: direct cast of a museum original. Cast in quality designer resin from a museum original, it is finished to replicate weathered stone, adding sophisticated style to your home or garden gallery.

Achilles Sculptural Bust 17" High

Achilles Sculptural Bust 17″ High

Achilles was the bravest of all Greeks as told in the stories of the Trojan Wars. Mythology portrays Achilles as powerful, cruel and arrogant, given to violent outbursts of temper. Nevertheless, to many he was a symbol of youth and bravery who was doomed to an early but glorious death, a hero of epic dimensions. Of course we all know his only weakness that lead to his demise, his heel. Achilles Sculptural Bust is made of bonded stone here in our Statue.com artisan work shop and is a Statue.com exclusive.

Be sure to head on over to our website to view more of our Greek and Roman sculptures, busts and inspired fountains. If you have something in mind but cannot find it on the website, feel free to contact us. Our excellent products coupled with our outstanding customer service ensures Statue.com is the best business for statuary and other fine goods.

Reach us by phone Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (CT) 618-692-1121 or Toll-Free at 877-675-2634.

Email us at sales@statue.com

Our fax number is 618-692-6775.

Send mail to us at: Statue.com, Inc., 100 N. Main St. Edwardsville, IL 62025.

We’d love to hear from you!

~Kristen

Auguste Rodin

A rendering of Rodin’s Left Hand of Eustache de St. Pierre, in which you can see virtual blood vessels and bone.

We love, love, love the idea of the newest exhibit on display at Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center. The exhibit diagnoses eight of the ten hands sculpted by Auguste Rodin. The hands were diagnosed by a Stanford School of Medicine hand surgeon for malformations and diseases. The exhibit combines the world of medicine and art in the most fascinating form.

Danaid Auguste Rodin

Danaid by Auguste Rodin

Not familiar with Rodin’s work? Rodin was intrigued by the human form. Most of his sculptures consisted of hands or the naked form. There is something sensual and romantic about his sculptures but technical and meticulous as well.

To view more Rodin sculptures head on over to our website . If you have something in mind but cannot find it on the website, feel free to contact us. Our excellent products coupled with our outstanding customer service ensures Statue.com is the best business for statuary and other fine goods.

You can read more about the exhibit here: Rodin’s hand sculptures diagnosed as part of exhibit

What are your thoughts on the exhibit? What is your favorite Rodin piece?

~Kristen

Faces of Amedeo Modigliani

The Faces of Amedeo Modigliani

Tête By Modigliani

Tête By Modigliani

Amedeo Modigliani was an Italian painter and sculptor. Modigliani led a short life with great artistic output. He considered himself a sculptor foremost and painter secondary.

However, towards the end of his life Modigliani painted exclusively. His move away from painting was fueled by failing health and decreasing supplies from the outbreak of World War I.

Posthumously, Modigliani’s sculpture  Tête, is the fifth highest grossing sculpture of all time. Modigliani was highly motivated and produced many pieces. Most of which he destroyed himself, considering the work inferior.

His infamous portraits and nudes are characterized by long faces and elongated necks. Modigliani’s subjects were mostly women. Of the few male portraits Modigliani painted, one was of the famous painter Pablo Picasso. Other subjects painted and sculpted by Modigliani include his lovers and friends.

Karyiatid Female Nude Statue Inspired by Modigliani

Karyiatid Female Nude Statue Inspired by Modigliani

Modigliani’s nude artwork was highly controversial at the time. In Paris, his only solo art showing, was temporarily shut down upon opening. He was forced to remove the nude artwork from the gallery’s street front window to reopen the gallery.

Modigliani’s fascination with the classical African and Etruscan artwork, passion for sculpture and distinct style transcend into his artwork. All of these factors make it difficult to pinpoint Modigliani into one genre among his peers.

We are proud to carry many reproductions of Modigliani’s sculptures and paintings. Head on over to our website to view our fine gallery of Modigliani sculptures.

If you have something in mind but cannot find it on the website, feel free to contact us. Our excellent products coupled with our outstanding customer service ensures Statue.com is the best business for statuary and other fine goods.

Reach us by phone Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (CT) 618-692-1121 or Toll-Free at 877-675-2634.

Email us at sales@statue.com

Our fax number is 618-692-6775.

Send mail to us at: Statue.com, Inc., 100 N. Main St. Edwardsville, IL 62025.

We’d love to hear from you!

~Kristen

 

 

 

Edgar Degas has always been one of my favorite painters. His ability to capture movement of his favorite subjects, ballet dancers, is parallel to no other artist. Even when not performing his delicate dancers appeared in fluid motion, blending the fierce pride of a ballerina with sharply defined muscles and graceful control.

I did not realize Degas was also a prolific sculptor until I was doing research for different piece for Statue.com. Apparently, his sculpting capabilities were not known to the world until after his death. The only sculpture he publicly unveiled was titled “Fourteen Year Old Little Dancer.” Critics at the time were not-so-nice to Degas’ step away his usual form of Impressionism. After that negative experience he kept his sculptures private. Degas gravitated towards sculpture largely due to his failing eyesight. It is hard to fathom losing the ability to partake in a talent that was once critically acclaimed. To channel those talents in a different way but not receive the same acclaim would be even more heartbreaking.

Dancer Looking at the Sole of Her Right Foot

One hundred and fifty sculptures were found in Degas’ studio upon his death. Nearly all had reached some form of deterioration, made of wax, clay and plastiline. There was much debate as to what to do with the sculptures. Luckily for us, Degas’s heirs granted casts to be made from seventy-two of the figures. Including the sculptures, Little Dancer of Fourteen Years, Dancer Looking at the Sole of Her Right Foot and Grande Arabesque. The sculptures were to be cast in bronze, as we know them today. Their rough from is attributed to the deterioration of his medium but no less beautiful.  It is a shame to think these sculptures could have been lost in time.

By now most of the original works have deteriorated even more. Majority of these sculptures were not completed due to Degas’ indecisiveness. This is a common theme through artists. Michelangelo left a vast amount of work uncompleted. I guess you could say great minds operate alike.

It is hard to deny the beauty of Degas’ sculptures even in their rough unfinished form.  We are very proud to include them in our Statue.com gallery.

Grande Arabesque

To view our gallery of fine statuary, head on over to our website http://www.statue.com. If you have something in mind but cannot find it on the website feel free to contact us.

Reach us by phone Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (CT) 618-692-1121 or Toll-Free at 877-675-2634

Our fax number is 618-692-6775.

Send mail to us at: Statue.com, Inc., 100 N. Main St. Edwardsville, IL 62025.

We’d love to hear from you!

~Kristen

 

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The famous sculptor we asked you to name is none other then Antonio Canova (1757-1822). Canova is known to be the greatest sculptor of his time throughout Europe. Both his father and grandfather were stone cutters and helped develop Canova’s trade. As soon as he could hold a pencil, he executed drawings under the guidance of his grandfather.  In 1780, Canova moved to Rome, Italy. It was here, he grew into his own as an artist and established his fame. Canova illustrated the Romantic Classicism that was so valued at the time, he created daring images of seductive elegance and form. Both the supple figures and tactful features of his work recalled the earlier Rococo, with its charm and realism, but he was firmly Neoclassic in his approach.

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Psyche Revived by Cupids Kiss was commissioned in 1787 and acquired by Joachim Murat in 1800, and entered the Louvre in 1824, two  years after Canova’s death.

Canova seduced the whole of Europe with his mythological compositions in which the purity of contours was used to portray a discrete eroticism. In the area of portraiture he was the absolute champion of idealization. He displayed a sensibility both to naturalism and to the early Renaissance, opening the way to two dominant trends at the beginning of the century: skilled realism and historical subject matter. These Canova sculptures will make a wonderful decor for your gallery or make a wonderful gift of historical and classical statuary.

No cheating! Name that sculptor…

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He is from the Republic of Venice…

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Famous for his work with marble…

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Check back tomorrow for more information!

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A Modern Discus Thrower also know as Contemporary Discobolus Sculpture can be found at www.Statue.com. The Olympic Games were first held in the year 776 B.C. In July of every fourth year men came together from all over the Greek world to participate in the athletic contests. Although there was great rivalry and intense competition among the athletes and their sponsoring city-states, the sacred games established a spirit of friendship and unity. Before the opening of each festival a sacred truce was called; throughout the land fighting ceased. The games continued at Olympia until their abolishment by the Emperor Theodosius in 394 A.D., more than one thousand years after they had been established. In 1896 the tradition was resumed. The participating nations felt that it was appropriate that the revival should take place in Greece where the games first took place. The great stadium in Athens was modernized for the event and a contemporary statue of a discus thrower by Dimitriades was placed directly facing the stadium. Throwing of the discus had been, as it is today, one of the five events of the original pentathlon. A Modern Discobolus was inspired by that of Dimitriades to reaffirm the ancient Greek belief that the body of man is glorious, as is his spirit.

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  1. Anatomical Study of Flayed Male L'ecorche by Houdon

    Here is a wonderful Drawing Cast for sale at http://www.Statue.com
    This is one of many Artist cast we offer!

    Anatomical Study of Flayed Male L’ecorche by Houdon. Anatomical Study (Houdon’s studio, late 18th century). In Rome, the young Houdon was given the opportunity to study human anatomy extensively thanks to a surgeon. In 1767, he modeled the famous L’ecorche, an anatomical study of a flayed male which allowed the muscles to be observed in detail. Soon afterward, every self-respecting academy in Europe had a copy of the sculpture which was freely reproduced in countless versions.Part of our Museum Collection of noteworthy museum statues, paintings and cultural artifacts. Houdon Anatomical Male Sculpture reproduction is made from resin with a bronze finish and measures 10 H x 4.5 W x 2.75 D.

    Hippocrates Bust 23" HighOne of our customers created two beautiful charcoal drawing of Hippocrates.  He used a solid white drawing cast model of Hippocrates for these exquisite works of art.  We welcome our customers to share how they use our products in creating works of art or in decorating their home, garden or business.

Please share any other drawings that have used are drawing cast with us:  hippocrates_drawing_cast1hippocrates_drawingcast2

Nineteenth century Art instruction often included the use of sculptural models as teaching aids for drawing, painting and sculpture study, known as Drawing Casts to emphasize the study of form and the visual effect that light and shadow had on these forms. A recent resurgence of interest in the use of these aids to teach art fundamentals has inspired Statue.com to create a collection of Artist Cast in a bonded stone or Plaster and finished in museum white, these classical cast are a staple for Art Studios, Schools, and Universities. Statue.com is proud to offer this high quality drawing casts as “tools of the trade,” maintaining the high tradition of a classical art training. Artists, Teachers, Designers and Decorators alike will appreciate the beauty in pure geometry, and we expect these shapes may even be displayed as accents of sculptural form and balance simply as design elements in your studio, learning institution or the aspiring artist.

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Seems like the Classical Statue fall away in the younger generation but if they have traveled to Europe they find a new found love of Art History. Working in the statuary business it always interest me in finding out something new in a Classical Historical sculpture such as this Faun playing Scabellum in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence Graeco-Roman statue. This striking version of the dancing satyrs, Pan, of Greek mythology has a completely human form. The Roman version of the dancing satyrs is called the dancing faun. In Greek mythology the dancing satyrs is known for his dancing, singing, laughter and chasing nymphs through the woods. Greek Mythology Satyrs the Dancing Satyrs was called Pan or Hylaeos, the forest god and guardian of the shepherds who worshipped Dionysus, the god of wine. Statues of the dancing satyrs range from a human form with the head and legs of a goat to a normal human form. The dancing satyrs, Pan, were the son of Hermes and Penelope, and born inArcady. The Dancing Satyrs was at home in the woods and enjoyed chasing the woodland nymphs. Pan would play the pipes and the nymphs would spend hours dancing and singing. Satyrs are always present at a Dionysus banquet or party, Dionysus was the Greek god of wine and ecstasy. The story of how Pan invented the pan pipes, which is similar to the pan flute, is an interesting mythological story. Pan was a joyful Satyr who loved dancing and playing on the shepherd’s pipe in the woods. One day Pan saw the nymph Syrinx and started after her. She ran until she came to a river. Syrinx turned into one of the reeds that lined the bank of the river. Pan could not recognize her so he grabbed a hand full of reeds hoping he could capture Syrinx, but he was unable to locate her. So Pan sat down beside the river and started tying the reeds together and soon he found that blowing over the ends made a beautiful sound, and it became known as the Pipes of Pan or a Seven Reed Shepherds Pipe. Faun is shown here playing the Scabellum which is a musical clapper that is operated by foot as depicted in the Greek and Roman Antiquities here with this Faun Sculpture. For years I have been selling this sculpture and knew what was under his foot! Now I know it is a musical Instrument. Not sure how it worked but it awesome to see I can find out something new from a Classic Sculpture I been selling for years. We at Statue.com have been provide Classical Sculptures since 1996 on the internet and it fun to find out new info on our statuary and Blog it!

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Venus of Willendorf

One of the most famous early images of a human is the “Venus of Willendorf” found in 1908 by archaeologist Josef Szombathy in an Aurignacian loess deposit in a terrace above the Danube River near the town of Willendorf Austria.  The statuette is carved from oolitic limestone not local to the area found and tinted with red ochre.  It is presumed to be carved elsewhere using flint tools. 

Originally thought to date from approximately 15,000 to 10,000 BC, a revised analysis done in 1990 estimates the carving to date from 24,000 to 22,000 BC.  It stands at just over 4 1/2 inches and seem to be meant to hold in one’s hand since she is lacking feet to stand upright. 

Taking the name “Venus” causes resistance in some modern analyses.    Many similar female statuette and images are collectively referred to as “Venus” figures although they pre-date the mythological figure of the goddess Venus by millennia.  This idealization of the female figure has traits of fatness and fertility that may have been highly desirable in the harsh ice-age environment in which the person who made this statue lived. 

It has been suggested that she was carved as a fertility idol due to the exaggerated breasts and genital areas.  She may also have been an early portrayal of “Mother Earth” and prominent female deity.  Unlike today, women in the Paleolithic society must have played a more dominant role.  The figurines and images of women are outnumber those of men supporting this theory.

Do you have any thoughts regarding this wonderful sculptural representation of our early cultural heritage?  Please send us your comments.  We would love to hear from you!

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